Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Dave Klien reviews my Javascript validator plugin in Groovy Mag (April)

So having popped my head up after an intensive month or so of major S**t going on in my life and trying to ship my new on-line service (written in grails of course). Anyway I just seen Mr Dave Klien has done a wonderful review of my Javascript Validation grails plug-in. So I bought the mag. It is actually very good so I recommend you do too. Anyway in his own words:

This plug-in has great potential. It will already save
significant development time in setting up client-side
validation and I’m sure it’s going to keep getting better.
Stop by the Grails Plugin Portal and check it out. You
can leave a comment with enhancement suggestions or
if you’ve tried it out, let others know what you think
with a rating. I’m giving it 5 stars!


I am really happy about this. It is nice to see that the things you do help other people. I guess that is what the open source community is all about. Anyway just wanted to express another thought.

I think the best things, the ones that rise above come from passion and believing "there has to be a better way". That's where the grails framework came from, where groovy came from, where Spring came from, Hibernate, hell even Java too one upon a time.

However another ingredient that means the difference between longevity or 15 seconds of fame is "coming from the trenches"... You can see that with grails.

Graeme Rocher built grails from is own real life experience of using web frameworks. That is why even now I find little gems of goodness in there. The framework helps you all the way from development to production. That is something special.

I guess with my own little javascript validator plug-in in a much much smaller way that same is true for me. I needed client side validation and I had used Sprig'svalang before with spring mvc and really missed it with Grails. So I built it. When I say built it a really mean I made the "glue of convenience" that glues together some already established fantastic framework patterns (grails constraints, i18n, commons validator js libs). Then guess what. I actually used it on my own project as a user. I made it fit my own needs while trying to keep it generic. Anyway I think that's why people love it.

One last final thought... I love this quote just can't remember who said it.

A reasonable man changes and adapts to the world around him. The unreasonable man changes and adapts the world around him. Therefore all the innovation in the world lies in the hands of the unreasonable man :)

Ps. I have two new plug ins coming out this week. Again the came from the trenches of a need for them in my own app. I am sure you will love them.

4 comments:

Edvinas said...

Nice thoughts!

"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
George Bernard Shaw

mgkimsal said...

Thanks for the kind words about GroovyMag. Dave does great work, finding excellent plugins like yours every month to help publicize them to a wider audience. I hope you continue to contribute your work to the community, and I hope the article helped bring a few more users your way. :)

Stephen said...

I left this comment on the grails.org plugin page, but I guess I'll put it here too.

I really want to use this plug-in. It looks great. Unfortunately, I can't use it with my UI requirements.

Would it be possible to get error messages to appear in different places based on what field failed its validation? I ask because I would like to make errors appear under the form field that caused it. See mint.com for an example.

buy custom essays said...

I think the common (non technical) use of the term refers to checking an HTML document for various problems using some type of computerized checker, and not necessarily by using a DTD with SGML tools